Melanie Kissell

Lactation “NAVIGATION”

feedposi

How should I hold my baby while breastfeeding?

* Hold your baby in a position where he can latch on well to suckle at your breasts easily and comfortably. To latch-on means that your baby has taken all of your nipple and part of your areola (dark circle around your nipple) far into his mouth.  When your baby is well latched-on during breastfeeding, you should have little or no discomfort in your nipple or breast.  Make sure you and your baby are relaxed during breastfeeding. This lets him empty your breasts completely.  Hold your baby in different positions each time you breastfeed to help remove breast milk in your breast.  Ask your caregiver or lactation specialist for more tips about how to hold and breastfeed your baby.

* You may breastfeed while sitting on a chair with a straight back or lying down. If you are sitting, you may hold your baby in a cradle or clutch (football) position.  If seated, make sure you are comfortable with good back and arm support.  Use a footstool to support your feet and raise your lap.  If lying down, you and your baby will be facing each other.  You and your baby need to be in a relaxed and comfortable position.  As your baby grows, you may need to adjust and use other types of body positions during breastfeeding.  Twins or infants born earlier than expected may need to use special types of positioning during breastfeeding.  Ask your caregiver or lactation specialist for more information about breastfeeding twins.

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Melanie Kissell

P.S.  I am a mother of Twins!

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